Tag Archive | writing

From the Start by Melissa Tagg

  

Awhile back, I reviewed Made to Last by Melissa Tagg and jumped at the chance to review her latest novel.   She  has also written a novella that is the prequel to this first book in her Walker Family series, and the e-novella is available for free as a digital download from Bethany House Publishers or on Amazon.  It isn’t necessary to read the novella first, but it’s a great, short love story. 

From the Start is a delightful romantic comedy set mostly in Iowa.  Melissa Tagg knows how important good dialogue is between the characters, and she incorporates just the right amount of wit, history, humor, and truth.  The characters are realistic with flaws and insecurities, and they don’t always say and do the right things, but they trust God to direct their paths.

Colton Greene is a former NFL quarterback who is trying to figure out what he is supposed to do now that an injury has forced him to retire early.  Colton is under contract to write a book about his life, but he doesn’t remember the most devastating thing that happened to him and doesn’t want to discuss it with a writer.  In the process of helping his friend Logan Walker, he meets Logan’s sister Kate, who just happens to be a writer.

Kate Walker is tired of writing romance scripts and wants to do something meaningful with her writing.   She receives an offer but needs money to pay for her travel.  She agrees to write Colton’s book even though she knows nothing about football.  In the process, she learns a great deal about the game and the player.

From the Start is a great book, filled with romance, humor, mystery, and a little suspense.  I highly recommend it. 

I received this book for free from Bethany House Publishers in exchange for an honest review.  These opinions are my own and are not influenced by the publisher.

Fiction

I love to read almost any type of fiction, and I love learning about different places, eras, and cultures through fiction. In the last month, I have visited Alaska, Texas, Louisiana, England, Scotland, the Smoky Mountains, and Pennsylvania via novels. I have learned about the Great Depression and the Civil War, cruise ships and trains, home improvement and restoration, scuba diving, cotton picking, cooking, etc. I have experienced it through the eyes of the rich and poor, young and old, male and female.

I love learning new words from authors and wish I had opportunities to use fancy words such as nebulous, nefarious, diaphanous, pejoratives, epiphanic, wizened, somnambulism, and others that provide lyrical prose and more accurate descriptions than vague, evil, see-through, insults, illuminating, wrinkled, and sleepwalking. I find myself mentally repeating vernacular phrases, colloquialisms, and out-dated sayings after reading them, and I wish I was confident enough to use them in conversation, but I fear that someone will think I am insane if I say “my feet found purchase” instead of “I landed on my feet”.

I enjoy losing myself in a romance, staying up late into the night with a suspenseful novel, finding dialogue or situations humorous, relating to characters’ feelings and struggles in life with love, loss, and faith. A good book can make me laugh out loud or bawl like a baby; the more exceptional ones can make me do both. I have been angry at authors and yearned to get to know other litterateurs.

I have read novels that helped me understand myself better, taught me how to forgive or move past hurts, and gave me insight into the actions of others. Fictional characters have kept me company on lonely nights, given me adult conversations on long days of caring for babies, and entertained my thoughts long after their story has concluded.

All of this makes me wish I could pen my own tales of adventure, suspense, and romance, but my imagination is lacking in the literary department. Fortunately for me, there is a plethora of fiction from which to choose.