Tag Archive | grief

Missing by Lisa Harris


Several months ago, I read Vendetta by Lisa Harris and felt I had finally found something similar to the FBI suspense thrillers I used to read (until they got weird).  Missing is Harris’s second novel in the Nikki Boyd Files and picks up just 5 weeks after Vendetta and follows Nikki and her team with the Tennessee Bureau of Investigation’s Missing Persons Special Task Force as an investigation unfolds.  

This investigation starts with homicides, but Nikki and her team race to find two missing people.  They are met with unusual circumstances that drag Nikki’s friend Tyler into the investigation.  Time is running out, and more people end up dead before the team gets a good lead.  The investigation reveals a complicated and tangled web of deceit and greed that leaves the reader in suspense through the end. 

Missing is a fast-paced, suspenseful book that kept me reading when I should have been doing other things.  I didn’t want it to end, but I couldn’t wait to get to the resolution.  I am most definitely reading the third installment next spring. 

I received this book for free from Revell in exchange for an honest review.  These thoughts and opinions are my own.  

Until the Harvest by Sarah Loudin Thomas

  
About a year ago, I had the pleasure of reading the lovely novella Appalachian Serenade by Sarah Loudin Thomas in anticipation of reading her first full-length novel, Miracle in a Dry Seasonlater that summer.  I am pleased to announce that her next book has been released and is just as delightful as her first two stories.  Until the Harvest jumps ahead a generation, but there are appearances from many of the characters of the previous book.  I always enjoy reading about familiar characters and seeing how their story ends or continues.  I was disappointed at the early demise of a main character from the previous book, but his death served as the catalyst for much of the conflict in Until the Harvest. 

Henry Phillips is a college student who makes several foolish decisions following the death of his father.  He gets tangled up in a couple of serious situations before seeking wise council.  

Margaret enjoys working for Henry’s grandmother, but Margaret’s mother thinks the position is too menial for her daughter.  Margaret finds a way to leave home and take her little sister with her, away from her selfish, inattentive parents. 

Initially, Henry and Margaret dislike each other, but they have two common interests who continually draw them together:  Margaret’s sister Mayfair and Henry’s grandmother Emily.  Over time, Henry and Margaret find they have much more in common than family and friends.  

This story is set in the mid-1970’s, but some aspects seem further back in history due to the slower pace in Appalachia.  I enjoyed reading about life on the farm and women living independently.  I learned a few things while enjoying a good read.  

I received this book for free from Bethany House in exchange for an honest review.