Archive | June 2016

Sea Rose Lane by Irene Hannon


Sea Rose Lane is a delightful, contemporary romance set in the small, coastal town of Hope Harbor in Oregon.  Hannon wrote a novel prior to this one that bears the name of this small town and contains some of the same characters.  Each book can be read alone, but I enjoyed Sea Rose Lane so much that I wish I had read Hope Harbor first.

Eric Nash was on the fast track to becoming a partner with his law firm, working too hard to have a life outside the office.  When his firm laid him off, he was devastated and determined to find a new firm in which to fulfill his long-held career plans.  With plenty of time off, Eric decides to visit his dad in Hope Harbor, but receives a huge shock when he arrives.

BJ Stevens is a talented, young architect who gave up a lucrative position in a Los Angeles firm to become her own boss in Hope Harbor.  BJ has adjusted well to life in the small town and is making an effort to help the senior citizens around town as well as employing a couple of hard workers who were down on their luck. 

When Eric and BJ meet, tensions escalate and fireworks explode, but not the good kind.  Eric rear-ends BJ’s truck, and they can’t seem to do anything but argue for awhile.  Then Eric demonstrates his true character in helping others and is able to slowly befriend BJ.

Sea Rose Lane is not your typical romance novel.  I was pleasantly surprised by the depth of all of the characters and by the subplots that added richness and intrigue to the story.  The novel contains heartache and loneliness, suffering and despair, guilt and grief, but it also has love and joy, peace and contentment, friendship and forgiveness.  In this book, Hannon treats devastating losses with respect and dignity while allowing each character to cope in their unique ways.  Of course, the underlying message is to trust God and allow him to help you get through those losses, but this book never felt religious or preachy.

I received this book for free from Revell in exchange for an honest review. 

Murder Comes by Mail by A. H. Gabhart 

About six months ago, I read Murder at the Courthouse, which introduced us to Deputy Sheriff Michael Keane and the rest of the characters in Gabhart’s small town of Hidden Springs.  The first novel in the series was so interesting that I requested the second installment, Murder Comes by Mail, from the publisher.  This second novel was as well-written as the previous one, but an undertone of evil was more prevalent throughout Murder Comes by Mail.  

From the first chapter, Michael Keane has a sense of foreboding that terrible things are to come.  Who knew that saving someone’s life could cause so many problems?  What sinister game is the killer playing?  The mystery and suspense for Michael continue through the final chapter.  

The life-long friendship between Michael and Alexandra continues to hover between friends and something more, but they are both afraid of venturing into the unknown.  There is just enough romance to keep the romantic happy, but not enough to turn away those who have no interest in romance.  

My only complaint (if I can even call it that) is that I figured out who the killer was before the main character did.  I just researched the phrase “whodunnit” and learned that this is a genre of books and movies.  

I’m accustomed to authors who conceal the identity of the perpetrator until the climax, so I was surprised to be able to deduce who the killer was in both of Gabhart’s novels.  Now I understand, and I’m looking forward to reading the next book in the Hidden Springs Mysteries series. 

I received this book for free from Revell in exchange for an honest review.